Glossary

Alopecia areata

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease that causes patchy hair loss on the scalp, beard, or eyebrows. It can affect people of all ages, genders, and ethnicities. Cause: The exact cause is unknown, but it’s believed the immune system mistakenly attacks hair follicles, interrupting the hair growth cycle. Stress, illness, or having a family history of alopecia areata can increase the risk. Symptoms: Sudden appearance of smooth, round or oval patches of hair loss, typically on the scalp but can occur anywhere hair grows. Treatment: There is no cure for alopecia areata, but treatments may help hair regrow faster. Options include:* Corticosteroid injections: Reduce inflammation in the hair follicles.* Topical medications like minoxidil: May stimulate hair growth.* Immunotherapy medications: Modulate the immune system response. Disclaimer: As with Androgenetic Alopecia, I am not a medical professional. This information is for general knowledge only. If you experience hair loss in patches, consult

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Androgenetic alopecia

Androgenetic alopecia, commonly known as male or female pattern baldness, is the most prevalent form of hair loss. It affects both men and women, though it presents differently. Cause: Androgenetic alopecia is hereditary and influenced by sex hormones. In men, it’s linked to the hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a byproduct of testosterone. DHT shrinks hair follicles over time, leading to progressively thinner and shorter hair growth until follicles miniaturize completely. In women, hormonal fluctuations throughout life, such as during pregnancy or menopause, can play a role. Symptoms:Men: Receding hairline at the temples, progressing to a “M” shape. Hair loss thins the crown of the head.Women: Thinning hair, particularly noticeable at the part line, with a general decrease in overall hair volume. Treatment:Minoxidil (Rogaine): Topical medication that stimulates hair growth.Finasteride (Propecia): Prescription medication that blocks DHT production (for men only).Low-level laser therapy: Promotes hair growth through light stimulation (efficacy is debated).Hair transplantation:

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Combination FUT/FUE

A Combination FUT/FUE hair transplant procedure utilizes both Follicular Unit Transplantation (FUT) and Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) techniques in a single surgery. This approach aims to combine the benefits of each method to address specific hair loss needs. Procedure:* The surgeon typically begins by harvesting grafts using the FUT method. This allows for a larger number of follicular units (FUs) to be collected efficiently, ideal for patients requiring significant hair restoration.* After extracting the FUT strip, the surgeon might switch to FUE to harvest additional FUs. This can be done for several reasons, such as:* Preserving the donor area for future procedures by minimizing the size of the FUT strip.* Extracting FUs from areas not accessible with FUT, like the beard or scalp sides.* The harvested FUs from both methods are then meticulously dissected and prepared under microscopes for transplantation.* Tiny recipient sites are created in the balding area, and

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Congenital alopecia

Congenital alopecia refers to a condition where an individual is born with little to no hair. This can range from complete baldness (including eyebrows and eyelashes) to patchy areas of hair loss. There are several underlying causes, each with varying degrees of severity and treatment options. Causes:* Genetic disorders: Mutations in genes responsible for hair follicle development can cause congenital alopecia. Examples include Atrichia with Papular Lesions (APL) and Hypotrichosis simplex.* Syndromic conditions: Congenital alopecia can be a symptom of a broader syndrome affecting multiple body systems. Examples include T-cell immunodeficiency, congenital alopecia, and nail dystrophy (TCAN) and Aplasia cutis congenita. Diagnosis:Diagnosis typically involves a physical examination of the scalp and hair, along with a detailed medical history. In some cases, genetic testing or a scalp biopsy may be needed to pinpoint the specific cause. Treatment:Unfortunately, there’s no cure for most forms of congenital alopecia. However, treatment options may focus

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Creating the Recipient Sites

In hair transplant surgery, recipient sites refer to the tiny openings created in the scalp where the transplanted hair follicles will be placed. These sites play a crucial role in the final outcome of the hair transplant, influencing hair growth direction, density, and overall natural appearance. Creating Recipient Sites:Creating recipient sites is a meticulous process typically performed by the surgeon using specialized tools like blades or needles. The size, depth, and angle of each recipient site are carefully planned and created based on: * Desired hair growth direction: The angle of the recipient site determines the direction the transplanted hair will ultimately grow. Matching the natural hair growth pattern in the recipient area is crucial for a natural look.* Follicular Unit (FU) size: The size of the recipient site needs to match the size of the transplanted FU (containing 1-4 hairs) to ensure a snug fit and minimize damage to

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Eyebrow Hair Loss

Eyebrow hair loss, also known as madarosis, is the thinning or complete absence of hair in the eyebrows. It can affect one or both eyebrows and can be caused by various factors, including: Medical conditions: Alopecia areata (an autoimmune disease that attacks hair follicles), thyroid disorders, skin conditions (eczema, psoriasis), and infections (fungal, bacterial). Treatments: Chemotherapy and radiation therapy can cause temporary or permanent eyebrow hair loss.Trauma: Over-plucking, burns, or injuries can damage hair follicles and lead to eyebrow loss.Nutritional deficiencies: Lack of iron, biotin, or other essential nutrients can contribute to hair loss.Stress: Severe or chronic stress can disrupt the hair growth cycle and cause temporary eyebrow thinning. Disclaimer: This information is for general knowledge only and does not constitute medical advice. If you are experiencing eyebrow hair loss, consult a dermatologist to determine the underlying cause and discuss treatment options.

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